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Think Big. Move Fast.

I’ve been obsessing over the Facebook platform since it launched last week. As has been extensively covered, its an incredible distribution platform for other companies. The most popular apps in the platform early on were existing companies like iLike, Rockyou (a Lightspeed company), HotorNot and Flixster (a Lightspeed company) who quickly ported their preexisting functionality to Facebook from other social media environments.

When I congratulated James Hong on HotorNot’s great growth in the platform yesterday, he responded:

We haven’t yet seen the native apps in Facebook. When they come they’ll grow even faster.

It’s taken less than 24 hours for him to be proved right. For the last 12-18 hours or so, the top recently popular app in the Facebook directory has been X me.

X Me
By Timothy Green
Tired of just poking? X me opens up a whole new world of action-based communication, for example ‘Hug Her, Slap Him, Tickle Them!’
346,696 users (15 friends) – 627 reviews

As I’ve posted about in the past, users can quickly adopt and understand new behaviors if they mirror current behaviors. It makes these new behaviors “easy to learn“. By mirroring the “poking” behavior that is well understood and native in Facebook, X Me has been able to quickly catapult to widespread adoption. The author, Tim Green, a freshman at Cambridge university, had done an outstanding job of building an incredibly viral app.

The Rockyou team was quick to spot the growth and has now brought Tim on board. Happily for them, they now have all three of the top three recently popular apps on Facebook. Congrats to both Tim and Rockyou!

Facebook most popular applications as of june 1st 2007

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For those who liked my previous post on how casual immersive worlds are hitting the mainstream in the US, there was a good article in Sunday’s San Francisco Chronicle, found via Ypulse.

My favorite comments was about webkinz, the plush toy that comes with a unique code for a matching online avatar:

“I don’t really play with it a lot,” Laurel said of her plush toy. “But sometimes, when I see it, it reminds me to go play (with the computer game).”

Genius.

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Allison Randal put up an interesting contrarian post on the O’Reilly Radar blog yesterday where she says:

The trend of moving traditional desktop applications to massively networked, Web 2.0 online applications like Google Docs is well-known. The problem is, a web browser is a terribly limited platform for application development, and JavaScript is a less-than-fully-featured language. There are inherent limitations to the kinds of applications you can develop and the kinds of user experiences you can offer in a web browser… Add in the fact that the nirvana of 100% connectivity at all times is far from a reality, even in the most technologically advanced parts of the world. This is a significant usability problem for the pure web browser applications, as anyone who has experienced the frequent forced coffee breaks by a Google Spreadsheet “waiting to connect” can confirm.

The wave of the future is not web browser applications. Instead we’re coming full circle back to desktop applications, but this time we’ve broken the old idea of single user silo applications with no connection to the outside world. The wave of the future is lightweight desktop applications with the same massively networked, Web 2.0 behavior we’ve come to expect from browser applications.

She goes on to give several examples, including iTunes and Songbird.

Its an insightful comment. We’ve tended to think of “Web 2.0″ as encompassing both rich web applications (vs. desktop applications) and social media, but there is no reason why these two things have to be intertwined. We’ve seen a number of non-social websites embrace rich web applications, and so its no surprise that we’re also seeing desktop apps (or plug-ins to desktop apps) also embrace social aspects. These are apps that work well for a lone user, but even better when the user joins a network.

Om Malik recently covered one of our portfolio companies, WeFi, that takes a similar approach. Just as Songbird’s primary functionality is as a desktop music player, but social aspects can improve the experience, so too WeFi‘s primary functionality is as a better WiFi connectivity manager (and against Win XP, that isn’t a high hurdle!), but social aspects can improve the experience. A lone user gets an easier and quicker experience for identifying and signing onto any hotspot, as well as better management control over hotspots that they own. As he joins a network, he gets to roam on other private hotspots, as well as the ability to find both his friends, and wifi hotspots on a map, relative to his location.

Another company enriching desktop apps with social functionality is Me.dium. Me.dium is a browser plugin that helps a lone user to see websites related to the current website being viewed. But when that user joins a network, she gets to see what sites her friends are browsing in real time, and how they are moving from site to site, adding a social dimension to relevance.

I’d be interested to hear from readers about other desktop apps that are taking a social approach.

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As I’ve said in the past, I think that distribution is the most important success factor in the early stages of any new consumer technology. Distribution used to mean getting a carriage deal done with a big portal. These …

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Online video is hot and everyone is scrambling to figure out how to best monetize it. Google just launched their “adsense for video” product, Advertising.com has Instream, and there are a host of startups attacking the problem as

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Simeon Simeonov points to some data from a Comscore survey talking about the effectiveness of advertising in UGC sites vs general media sites by advertising category for the coveted 18-34 year old demographic:

Effectiveness of advertising by category for UGC vs general media sites

It suggests that this demographic is more …

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Well it was a busy week last week, what with WPP agreeing to buy 24/7 and Microsoft agreeing to buy Aquantive. I was on vacation overseas, so didn’t get a chance to post my thoughts on it as it …

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For many US based startup online media companies, intenational users are largely an afterthought. As I am an Australian, this has always annoyed me. But it is becoming increasingly clear, much as it pains me, that US based startups are …

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Walter E. Hussman Jr., the Publisher of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (the major paper in Little Rock), wrote a fascinating opinion column in today’s Wall Street Journal (subscription required) entitled “How to Sink a Newspaper“. He take a contrarian …

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On Friday Om Malik put up an interesting post about how small companies can now fully benefit from the internet in a way that was once open to only companies at greater scale.

In his article Om namechecks Moocards (mini …

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