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Think Big. Move Fast.

MIT Technology Review has two good articles about microblogging in the November/December issue. (Both are behind a free registration wall.) The puff piece on Evan Williams and Twitter notes some of his thoughts on micbroblogging:

The criticism doesn’t seem to bother Williams, in part because he’s heard it before. “Actually, listening to people talk about Twitter over the last few months, you hear that almost all the arguments against it are the exact same arguments that people had against Blogger,” he says. “‘Why would anyone want to do this?’ ‘It’s pointless.’ ‘It’s trivial.’ ‘It’s self-aggrandizing bullshit.’ ‘It’s not technically interesting.’ ‘There’s nothing to it.’ ‘How is this different from X, Y, and Z that’s existed for the past 10 years?'” Indeed, there were blogging tools available when Blogger was released, and others have emerged since–including TypePad from Six Apart, which offers more features. But none has the simple appeal of Blogger, and none is as easy to use. These were the reasons Blogger was such an important force in the blogging revolution.

There is an interesting idea at the heart of all this, and that is the idea of innovation through removing features. By focusing on a subset of core functionality, both Blogger and Twitter (and the other microblogging startups, as well as Facebook’s status) have made the user interaction much lighter weight. In my experience at AOL, Netscape and IAC, lightweight interactions generally work better with the general public.

Last year Gartner predicted that blogging would peak in 2007:

The analysts said that during the middle of next year the number of blogs will level out at about 100 million. The firm has said that 200 million people have already stopped writing their blogs… Gartner analyst Daryl Plummer said the reason for the levelling off in blogging was due to the fact that most people who would ever start a web blog had already done so. He said those who loved blogging were committed to keeping it up, while others had become bored and moved on.
“A lot of people have been in and out of this thing,” Mr Plummer said. “Everyone thinks they have something to say, until they’re put on stage and asked to say it.”

Microblogging removes some of the pressure to write substantive posts, making it a lighter interaction that is easier to keep up.

The public’s preference for lightweight self expression is part of what has made widget providers (such as Rock You, a Lightspeed company), profile layout sites (such as Free Code Source) and quiz sites (such as Quizilla) so successful.