LP Login

Think Big. Move Fast.

Glam has received a lot of attention recently, with many noting that its Comscore traffic is a rollup of multiple sites, some Glam branded, but most part of an affiliate network.

While Glam is more like a vertical ad network (which it readily admits to), there are many other well known sites that derive meaningful amounts of their Comscore traffic from unexpected sources. Among Comscore’s top 100 web properties, Ask, CNet, the New York Times, Move.com and iVillage all also generate the majority of their network pageviews from sites other than their namesake:

traffic analysis for top network sites.

The non-namesake traffic was mostly driven through acquisition, although in some cases (e.g. Zwinky) the growth was organic. In many other examples though, acquisitions have been absorbed into the URL structure of the acquiring company. Yahoo for example acquired Launch (now music.yahoo.com), Hotjobs (now hotjobs.yahoo.com) Geocites (now geocities.yahoo.com), among others, all of which now roll up under the Yahoo.com URL.

Whether ad networks or acquisitions, Comscore’s “media property” reporting often includes a lot more than the namesake URL in the rollup. While this can come as a surprise to the unwary, it is no surprise to the people that matter – the people who are buying online advertising. As one media buyer commented on the Techcrunch article about Glam (abridged quote):

As an online media buyer, perhaps I have a different opinion then most of the outsiders commenting on the sidelines. I use comScore and NetRatings on a daily basis for planning media spends targeting large audiences online… The only way to measure the audience that any large media property reaches is through a panel based media measurement tool like comScore… It does not matter if they own a site or have a partnership with them.

This stuff is no big secret.